2017 Management Decisions – Planting Date

This week we continue with our management decisions series. Last week we discussed seeding rate and how you may be able to save money by decreasing your seeding rates. If you missed it, catch up here. In part two of our management decisions series, we’re talking planting date. Before we get into some data, it’s…

Details

2017 Management Decisions – Seeding Rates

As we gear up for #plant17, now is the time to start thinking about planting management decisions. At this point, most of you have selected varieties and purchased seed, so one of the next things to think about is soybean seeding rate. Conventional wisdom says planting high populations will ensure maximum yields, but actually, this…

Details

Vietnam Feeds Fish U.S. Soy

Three North Carolina soy growers recently toured aquaculture farms and fish processing plants in Vietnam.  Ryan Cahoon, Brett Medlin and Simmy Williams were part of a trade team organized by the U.S. Soy Export Council (USSEC) to increase U.S. soy consumption in Vietnam. Fish farmers in Asia are a large and growing market for U.S.…

Details

Cargill Locations Schedule Maintenance

Cargill’s processing plant in Fayetteville is scheduled to undergo maintenance for six weeks starting in early April.  In the meantime, sellers report that the Fayetteville plant is taking deliveries on a limited basis only due to nearly full storage.  The Cargill Raleigh location is closed for deliveries at this time.  And the Cargill Selma location…

Details

Factors That Have the Biggest Impact on Yield

At this time of the year, farmers have their eye on yield monitors, and there will undoubtedly be some parts of fields that have higher yields than others. Why is this, what factors can lead to the greatest yield loss and what strategies can farmers use for the greatest return on investment? The High-Yield project…

Details

Back-to-Back Soybeans

              A disclaimer before we start: We do NOT recommend planting soybeans back-to-back year after year. Planting any crop back-to-back year after year increases the potential for pests and problems to build up. You may not see these problems after one year, but eventually, something will become an issue…

Details